Onwards to Jamaica

Onwards to Jamaica

Too many cops, too little justice

Too many cops, too little justice

Setting the beat

Setting the beat

Beware of vicious cops

Beware of vicious cops

We demand justice

We demand justice

Street vendors for Sean Bell

Street vendors for Sean Bell

In memorium

In memorium

Protestors were not shy communicating their outrage to the police who escorted them. “We are all Sean Bell, NYPD go to hell,” they chanted. As they made their way to Jamaica, locals greeted them by coming out of restaurants, bars and laundromats, often cheering loudly. Others watched from their windows and terraces. Bus drivers honked their horns, as did others in cars.

50 was a number that was on everyone’s mind. “50 shots equals murder,” protestors shouted, then giving way to repeated counts from one to fifty. As the march then passed through a tunnel, near the Long Island Railroad terminal that was lined with police, the crowd honored Sean Bell, through spontaneous uproars, clappings, and raising of fists. In his honor, many just invoked his name, shouting: Sean Bell, Sean Bell, Sean Bell — raising up the memory the courts would rather bury.

The march concluded at 8:00 p.m., shortly after sunset, near the place of the brutal shooting. Organizers from the People’s Justice Coalition addressed the crowd, urging people to continue the spirit of vigilance into tomorrow and the next day. One speaker spoke especially of the need for community members to step up and take on the role of monitoring police activity. As she gave examples of common racist and classist police practices, people yelled out in recognition and conviction.